UX and Due Diligence

Ux-for-digital-products
UX is the key to a congested tech landscape.

Day to day living has changed dramatically due to the ability to connect via a diverse range of devices. Society has entered a hyper-connected movement that allows social, educational, and business spheres to be separated. The power of software and wired devices encourages users to savour the privacy,  anonymity, invisibility and convenience of the Internet as a platform.

Users quickly become dependent on being connected online and are swift to evaluate how efficiently and effectively a product meets these needs.

Understanding how and why people accept or reject a product is the framework for improving product user experience, and consequently product success in an ever-crowding marketplace.

As investors assess opportunities within the congested “tech” landscape, it becomes crucial to include a consideration of the product’s user experience as the unique differentiator. Likewise, as companies examine digital media products for acquisition or partnership, it is absolutely paramount that a user-centred evaluation of the product’s potential and features is outlined in the forward-looking growth strategy.

Leaders ought to consider the following two issues when evaluating a product’s potential:

1) The product’s ability to evolve and adapt to user needs

While product evolution and adaptation may be assumed elements of success, the ability to change quickly to respond to market needs should not be taken for granted. Costly, early builds inevitably become legacy products in the rapidly changing digital media environment. Furthermore, if any element of a service relies on such a legacy system, then the service cannot be so concisely defined and tied to that system that service itself cannot evolve. It is nearly impossible for software and system developers to anticipate all user needs and context of use scenarios. The very genius of an initial product concept should not be its own demise. A product or concept must have an inherent adaptability and this adaptability relies on a user-centred positioning. Where the concept and usage states fully tested with potential target audiences? How was user research and feedback incorporated into the development process? And, finally, is there a development framework that allows user feedback to fuel future innovation?
2) The development team’s approach to incorporating user requirements

Brilliant minds are frequently forthright when it comes to clarity of strategy, but is there too much pride if never considering a fall? There are times when leaders, product teams, designers and engineers are so thoroughly embedded within their own product experience that they are unable to strategically execute on user experience and customer insight. A simple resolution for any such reluctance and resistance is to ensure that customer insight and UX are the driving values of the product development cycle. Quite simply, in order to embrace the technology, a user must be able to use the technology, and much more so, achieve mastery of the product for any sense of self-efficacy. When a team recognises that product adoption is a core aspect of innovation, then a user centred philosophy is the natural approach.  “But customers don’t know what they want!” The second point is not to suggest that development teams should be led solely by user requirements. However, leadership teams must be amenable to input from users and implement structured changes based on feedback by finding the innovation on the solution that leads to rich, product differentiation.

User experience analysis provides an accurate valuation of digital media products in the marketplace by providing quantifiable and impartial insights. The UX field has expanded to include research, design, development, and project management. Many agencies and companies have adopted a user-centred development process as a key competitive edge. While challenges remain as to how UX insight successfully merges with business strategy, one adage remains clear: the customer may not know what they want, but the customer is always right.

 

Andrea M Lewis
Andrea Lewis is a psychologist and Managing Director of Ad Hoc Global Ltd. With a foundation in equity research, she has been leading product development in technology and digital media for over 12 years and leads UX due diligence assessments, research, and strategy.
Andrea M Lewis

About Andrea M Lewis

Andrea Lewis is a psychologist and Managing Director of Ad Hoc Global Ltd. With a foundation in equity research, she has been leading product development in technology and digital media for over 12 years and leads UX due diligence assessments, research, and strategy.